Thoughts/Notes # 776-800

776.    We should be careful not to make Takfeer of Muslims for sins they commit (even major sins) since this is the person’s right as an apparent outwardly Muslim (i.e., it is his right not to be anathematized solely due to sins), and also this practice is not part of Sunni ‘Aqeedah. This does not prevent us from speaking out against the very evil deeds some Muslims commit, even to the point of fighting them if necessary; even if they are killed, they would still be counted, treated, and buried as Muslims after death.

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(As mentioned): It may be…

(As mentioned): It may be that the Muslim civilians killed today [killed by all sides, but specifically by those claiming to do it for the sake of Allah] will be like the buried-alive girl who is asked why she was killed, so what will await the killers?

Is it not interesting, that…

Is it not interesting, that we have people clamoring for social justice and human rights, while also calling for the end of ‘Oppressive Islam’? This is very weird, since both calls are in fact proceeding from one source, whether the clamorers realize it or not. (So it is suspicious that “justice” and “human rights” are often tied so closely with a call to end “oppressive Islam” or “very outwardly visible Islam” – this is true for all sides of the modern political spectrum, it is definitely not exclusive to the far-right).

People ask that why do…

People ask that why do Sunnis prefer tyranny rather than trying to quickly change the top of the polity to a religiously better situation, even if some violence is involved?

Considering this is not always the true Sunni position and the rulings may change from case to case, yet one general partial answer is: We see that in the first case [of tyranny] some people lose rights and there is erosion of laws, true.

But in the second case, everyone loses rights and all laws are thrown out and this may happen on a gross unimaginably terrible scale, people cannot even cross the street to work, pray, buy food, etc., for fear of dying. This is not mere rhetoric, this has been seen throughout history in the lands of the Muslims.

This is because the tyrant will (obviously) usually not give up on his power easily, or through persuasion, or negotiations, etc. Unless the force to make the situation change for the better is so overwhelming and so quick that a greater loss is averted, one can foresee a catastrophic situation descending on the land and for the Muslims, not only in their persons, but even for their Iman (belief).

Also of note is that many attempts to change tyranny are not Islamically-based to begin with but may be due to egoistic reasons, or based on competing yet non-Islamic principles, or narrow sectarian visions of what “Islam” ought to be, so the end result of the “end of tyranny” even if it comes to pass may perhaps be worse for normative, orthodox Muslims. All told then, it is difficult for the Sunni ‘Ulama to make a blanket statement to the effect that violent revolutions/overthrows are the proper way to improve the physical (and crucially) the belief of the Muslim Ummah whenever a tyrannical situation presents itself.

(Of course, there might be counter-arguments against this, but this is one opinion, and it is being shown as it was presented with some additional commentary).

(In connection to core Islamic…

(In connection to core Islamic disciplines, but also applicable beyond) We have to pay attention on whether the subject or class we are taking is fulfilling our needs, and if not, why not. Perhaps the hidden lessons were not communicated properly, or perhaps the science has a goal and a limit other than what one seeks or needs.

The point of the Prophet’s…

The point of the Prophet’s (ﷺ) life just before the Isra’ wal Miraj was at its outwardly ‘lowest’ in that he was rejected in Taif and had to ask for protection from one of the inhabitants of Makkah to re-enter his own city, in spite of the loftiness he (ﷺ) held in the eyes of all Makkans. Yet a gross materialist person’s perspective of the Prophet (ﷺ) at this stage would be totally at odds with the rank he (ﷺ) had with Allah, and how Allah was about to honor him (ﷺ) even more.

(As mentioned): Why do we…

(As mentioned): Why do we say ‘Dhikr of Allah?’ It is because of the initial Meethaq of Alust (Qur’anic Verse 7:172), meaning that we remember something we already know every time we engage in Dhikr.

The Qur’an and the primary…

The Qur’an and the primary Islamic texts (more so the Qu’ran) have an ability to bring out the true character of a person: if they are filled with hate, arrogance, lust, or inveterate anger, they will see only that and deduce only this about Islam, the Sirah, etc. But if they have wisdom, love, and forbearance, they will see and reflect these characteristics of the Quran, the Sirah, the Ahadith, etc.

Jealousy (Hasad) is in its…

Jealousy (Hasad) is in its essence anger with Allah the Exalted at His present distribution of blessings, as if the person is an Iblis-type figure who could not bear to see others exalted above him. So we should be particularly careful as emotions like jealousy and arrogance are all interconnected.

The Mu’jiza of a Prophet…

The Mu’jiza of a Prophet (Alayhi as-Salaam) occurs invariably after the claim, not before it (since verification has to be established for the Prophetic claim).